Check out these spring 2018 Biology Lectures (each counts as an upper level lecture in the Biology major)!

BIOL-L 402 ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY AND GLOBAL CHANGE (3)

L 402 : P – BIOL-L 111 and L 112, junior or senior standing (except with permission from instructor). BIOL-L 473 and CHEM-C 117 strongly encouraged.

Regular Academic Session 1/8 – 5/4; TuTh 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM JH 248

Course Description

Explains how ecosystems function and how and why ecosystems differ in their sensitivity to stress, disturbance and global change. Introduces key concepts and approaches used in the field of ecosystem ecology: ecosystem energetics; biogeochemical cycles and budgets; and the response of ecosystems to stress, disturbance and global change. Focuses on patterns and processes in aquatic, terrestrial and wetland ecosystems.

BIOL-L 472 MICROBIAL ECOLOGY (3)

L 472 : P – L211 or M250 Class focuses on microbiomes, diverse assemblages of bacteria, fungi, archaea, and viruses that critically influence the health of humans, other hosts, and the environment.

Regular Academic Session 1/8 – 5/4; TuTh 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM JH 065

Course Description

Principles of microbial ecology with emphasis on the population, community, and ecosystem ecology of bacteria and fungi.

BIOL-L 410 TOPICAL ISSUES IN BIOLOGY (GENETICS OF BEHAVIOR)

Prerequisites: BIOL-L 111, BIOL-L 112, BIOL-L 113, BIOL-L 211

Regular Academic Session 1/8 – 5/4; MW 1:00 PM – 2:15 PM HD TBA

Course description:

It is easy to accept the fact that certain individual human properties are in large part genetically determined.  We have no difficulty in believing that our eye color, our hair, our height, or our blood pressure are features that vary due to the exact complement of inherited genetic variants.  Yet, when it comes to our brains and our behavior, genetic determinism becomes more difficult to accept and is highly controversial.  Do “behavior genes” exist?  How would one define a gene as a behavior gene?  These are some of the questions that we will attempt to answer in this class.  First, we will review the literature that demonstrates concrete examples of how single genes can affect behaviors.  Then, we will examine the evidence from simple animals like insects as well as rodent models.  Finally, we will examine the evidence that specific gene variants can affect human behavior in very specific and interesting ways.

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